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Behavior Analysis Foundations I: Series of 4 one-hour events

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Speakers: John Wesenberg, BCBA, LBA (Learn more about this speaker.) Instructor: Angela Cathey, PhD
CEU(s) Available: 4.0 Type II CEUs for BCBAs through DrDJMoran, Provider # OP-20-3305

Duration: 4, 60-minute events:
1. Behavior Analysis Foundations I: Philosophical Assumptions: Now on-demand
2. Behavior Analysis Foundations I: Dimensions of Behavior: Now on-demand
3. Behavior Analysis Foundations I: Operational Definitions of Behavior  – Live Feb, 15th 4pm CST, on-demand 24 hours later
4. Behavior Analysis Foundations I: Functions of Behavior  – Live Feb, 22nd 4pm CST, on-demand 24 hours later
Modality: Online, on-demand 24 hours after live event

Overview: Behavior Analysis Foundations I

Session 1. Philosophical Assumptions

Abstract: Behavior analysis is different than traditional psychology in that we believe behavior is to be studied as a natural science. Like physics or chemistry, we conduct research and develop theories for explanations of behavior. More specifically, behavior is a consequence of a person’s interactions within their environment, and these “interactions” are what we study. Like other natural sciences, behavior analysis follows a methodology that describes our science. These are (1) determinism, (2) empiricism, (3) experimentation, (4) replication, (5) parsimony, (6) philosophical doubts, and (7) pragmatism. When clinicians follow these “attitudes” of behavior analysis, we are most able to solve problems of social significance.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to articulate the philosophical assumptions of Behavior Analysis.
  2. Participants will be able to identify how the philosophical assumptions are crucial in identifying the nature of behavioral events.

Session 2. Dimensions of Behavior

Abstract: Behavior analysis is a valuable science, may even be the most valuable science in today’s culture. We help solve and reduce problems of social significance. To serve as criteria for judging and valuing the importance of behavior analysis, Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968) defined seven dimensions to help “pave the way.” These are (1) applied, (2) behavioral, (3) analytic, (4) technological, (5) conceptually systematic, (6) effective, and (7) generalizable. The seven dimensions have guided behavior analysis to study and then solve problems of social importance for over 50 years.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to identify and give an example of the 7 dimensions of behavior.

Session 3. Operationalized Definitions of Behavior

Abstract: To best serve our clients, we must know if our treatment package is responsible for changing behavior. Evidence of “learning” is indicated by change in behavior. But, first, we must know what behavior is to be changed by defining it in observable and measurable terms. This will orientate us toward behaviors that are meaningful and are more readily targeted for behavior change. Intervention procedures are deemed “successful” only if they are defined by their effect on behavior. Therefore, we cannot use judgments and anecdotal reports of behavior change to be effective clinicians. Accountability and correct documentation of observable and measurable behavior are of most importance when reducing or solving socially significant problems.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to define at least 1 observable and measurable behavior. Give non-examples as well.
  2. Participants will be able to give non-examples of observable and measurable behavior.

Session 4. Functions of Behavior

Abstract: Clinicians do their best to predict and control the behavior of an individual person. Therefore, when we work with clients, our goal is to explain behavior in terms of its functional relation to their environment. Skinner defined the term functional relation to the relation in which a change in an independent variable produces an orderly and predictable change in a dependent variable. Behavior analysis examines the antecedents and consequent environmental events that shape behavior. Specifically, we identify the consequences that follow behavior. The consequence that is responsible for an increase in the future likelihood of a response is a reinforcer. Either the presentation (positive) or removal (negative) of a stimulus, by definition, is the reason why a behavior a person continues to engage in a behavior. Behavior has a purpose, and behavior analysis seeks to find a person’s purpose.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to explain the difference between positive and negative reinforcement.
  2. Participants will be able to identify function(s) of behavior in real-world examples.

    John Wesenberg, M.S., BCBA, LBA
    is a behavior analyst and Director of Operations for Better Living Center for Behavioral Health, a multi-disciplinary team provider third-wave behavior therapies to individuals diagnosed with OCD and other anxiety disorders.
Clear

Speakers: John Wesenberg, BCBA, LBA (Learn more about this speaker.) Instructor: Angela Cathey, PhD
CEU(s) Available: 4.0 Type II CEUs for BCBAs through DrDJMoran, Provider # OP-20-3305

Duration: 4, 60-minute events:
1. Behavior Analysis Foundations I: Philosophical Assumptions: Now on-demand
2. Behavior Analysis Foundations I: Dimensions of Behavior: Now on-demand
3. Behavior Analysis Foundations I: Operational Definitions of Behavior  - Live Feb, 15th 4pm CST, on-demand 24 hours later
4. Behavior Analysis Foundations I: Functions of Behavior  - Live Feb, 22nd 4pm CST, on-demand 24 hours later
Modality: Online, on-demand 24 hours after live event

Overview: Behavior Analysis Foundations I

Session 1. Philosophical Assumptions

Abstract: Behavior analysis is different than traditional psychology in that we believe behavior is to be studied as a natural science. Like physics or chemistry, we conduct research and develop theories for explanations of behavior. More specifically, behavior is a consequence of a person’s interactions within their environment, and these “interactions” are what we study. Like other natural sciences, behavior analysis follows a methodology that describes our science. These are (1) determinism, (2) empiricism, (3) experimentation, (4) replication, (5) parsimony, (6) philosophical doubts, and (7) pragmatism. When clinicians follow these “attitudes” of behavior analysis, we are most able to solve problems of social significance.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to articulate the philosophical assumptions of Behavior Analysis.
  2. Participants will be able to identify how the philosophical assumptions are crucial in identifying the nature of behavioral events.

Session 2. Dimensions of Behavior

Abstract: Behavior analysis is a valuable science, may even be the most valuable science in today’s culture. We help solve and reduce problems of social significance. To serve as criteria for judging and valuing the importance of behavior analysis, Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968) defined seven dimensions to help “pave the way.” These are (1) applied, (2) behavioral, (3) analytic, (4) technological, (5) conceptually systematic, (6) effective, and (7) generalizable. The seven dimensions have guided behavior analysis to study and then solve problems of social importance for over 50 years.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to identify and give an example of the 7 dimensions of behavior.

Session 3. Operationalized Definitions of Behavior

Abstract: To best serve our clients, we must know if our treatment package is responsible for changing behavior. Evidence of “learning” is indicated by change in behavior. But, first, we must know what behavior is to be changed by defining it in observable and measurable terms. This will orientate us toward behaviors that are meaningful and are more readily targeted for behavior change. Intervention procedures are deemed “successful” only if they are defined by their effect on behavior. Therefore, we cannot use judgments and anecdotal reports of behavior change to be effective clinicians. Accountability and correct documentation of observable and measurable behavior are of most importance when reducing or solving socially significant problems.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to define at least 1 observable and measurable behavior. Give non-examples as well.
  2. Participants will be able to give non-examples of observable and measurable behavior.

Session 4. Functions of Behavior

Abstract: Clinicians do their best to predict and control the behavior of an individual person. Therefore, when we work with clients, our goal is to explain behavior in terms of its functional relation to their environment. Skinner defined the term functional relation to the relation in which a change in an independent variable produces an orderly and predictable change in a dependent variable. Behavior analysis examines the antecedents and consequent environmental events that shape behavior. Specifically, we identify the consequences that follow behavior. The consequence that is responsible for an increase in the future likelihood of a response is a reinforcer. Either the presentation (positive) or removal (negative) of a stimulus, by definition, is the reason why a behavior a person continues to engage in a behavior. Behavior has a purpose, and behavior analysis seeks to find a person’s purpose.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to explain the difference between positive and negative reinforcement.
  2. Participants will be able to identify function(s) of behavior in real-world examples.

    John Wesenberg, M.S., BCBA, LBA
    is a behavior analyst and Director of Operations for Better Living Center for Behavioral Health, a multi-disciplinary team provider third-wave behavior therapies to individuals diagnosed with OCD and other anxiety disorders.

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